Johnny Kauffman | WABE 90.1 FM

Johnny Kauffman

Reporter

Johnny joined WABE in March, 2015. Before joining the station, he was a producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting, and NPR in Washington D.C.

At NPR, Johnny worked as a producer for "Morning Edition," "Weekend Edition," and "Tell Me More."

Johnny got his start in radio as host and station manager at WECI in Richmond, Indiana, where he went to Earlham College and graduated with a degree in English.

Johnny is a native of Goshen, Indiana, a small town in the northern part of the state.

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio speaks to supporters in Buckhead.
Johnny Kauffman / WABE

Rep. Geoff Duncan, R-Cumming, took the stage before Rubio. 

He said, "There's nobody I trust more in this campaign to handle this nation's security."

Rubio gave a stump speech that addressed North Korea, Russia and reached its climax with harsh criticism of the Iran nuclear deal.

"The Iranians run by a radical Shia cleric will also develop a nuclear weapon because of this recent deal the president is ramming down our throats," Rubio said.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during the CNN Republican presidential debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, in Simi Valley, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill / AP Photo

The latest stop on the campaign trail for Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio is Atlanta.

He's visiting the Marriott Buckhead Hotel and Conference Center Monday.

The SEC primary isn't until March 1, but right now the Republican candidate to beat is Donald Trump.

In last week's debate Rubio brought up his Hispanic heritage in an effort to separate himself from Trump's rhetoric on immigration.

Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, details his tax reform plan in a speech at Morris & Associates in Garner, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome
Gerry Broome / Associated Press

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is planning to attend the South Carolina vs. Georgia college football game Saturday in Athens to raise money and get the attention of potential voters in what's being called the SEC primary on March 1.  

The primary has that name because it includes Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and other Southern states. 

Republican leaders established it hoping to give the South more say in the 2016 presidential race, and it's also likely to bring more candidates to football games. 

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