Features | WABE 90.1 FM

Features

When people line up at a coffee shop for their morning brew or crowd a bookstore to meet a famous author, don't assume they're patronizing a national chain.

Many independent stores have been able to survive, thrive and even launch in spite of competition from big box retailers like Wal-Mart, Barnes & Noble and Home Depot. Indies are doing this by becoming more a part of the fabric in the communities they serve, offering more personalized service and unique ambience than the bigger guys.

An employee of the Protestant parish in Besigheim points to an entry in the parish register in Besigheim, near Stuttgart, southern Germany on Thursday, June 4, 2009, which marks the ancestor of U.S. President Barack Obama.
Daniel Maurer / Associated Press

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

In the “nature versus nurture” debate of human identity, the “nurture” part is pretty easy to figure out. You likely know how and where you grew up, and by whom.

Alison Guillory / WABE

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

As I write this reflection regarding my response to DNA results, I’m reminded of the first time I saw the television mini-series, "Roots."  

Alison Guillory / WABE

This is part of WABE’s ongoing series “Finding Your Roots.”

“Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” airs Wednesday at 6 p.m. on PBA30 TV with an encore Saturday at 7 p.m. Watch a preview of Season 3, and see the full schedule at www.pba.org/roots

I had high hopes that, somewhere deep in my DNA, there was an untold story. A family secret. A trace of a mysterious, exotic past.

Something.

Two Atlanta convenience store owners have pleaded guilty to illegally exchanging food stamps for millions of dollars.
U.S. Department of Agriculture via flickr.com / https://flic.kr/p/83r1Zc

The Agriculture Department unveiled new rules Tuesday that would force retailers who accept food stamps to stock a wider variety of healthy foods or face the loss of business as consumers shop elsewhere.

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