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Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press

When Debra Aldridge became her grandson's primary caregiver, she was making $7.50 per hour as a cook. The alternative for the newborn, she was told, was to put him up for adoption.

"I took one look at the little fella, and that was it," said Aldridge, now 62. "I couldn't let go."

For more than 11 years, Aldridge, who is divorced and lives in Chicago, has struggled to feed, house and clothe her "baby," Mario. As she ages, she is sinking deeper into poverty.

Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press

When Debra Aldridge became her grandson's primary caregiver, she was making $7.50 per hour as a cook. The alternative for the newborn, she was told, was to put him up for adoption.

"I took one look at the little fella, and that was it," said Aldridge, now 62. "I couldn't let go."

For more than 11 years, Aldridge, who is divorced and lives in Chicago, has struggled to feed, house and clothe her "baby," Mario. As she ages, she is sinking deeper into poverty.

At Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region / flickr.com/usfwssoutheast/

Sometimes what scientists need to protect a threatened species is a chainsaw, some roofing material and a little bit of creativity. On the Georgia coast, the Department of Natural Resources is channeling MacGyver to help out a big, gawky, bald-headed bird.

It’s a bird that hasn’t always nested in Georgia, but now that it does, scientists are working to protect it.

Wood Storks

Wood storks aren’t exactly conventionally beautiful.

The mayor of Cleveland apologized Thursday to the family of  Tamir Rice, a black 12-year-old boy fatally shot by a white Cleveland police officer, for the city having sent the administrator of the boy's estate a "decedent's last dying expense" claim of $500 for ambulance services.

Mayor Frank Jackson opened a City Hall news conference by saying, "We want to start off again apologizing to the Rice family if in fact this has added to any grief or pain they may have."

Tom Houck Cover
Alison Guillory / WABE

This story was published in February 2016.

Fifty years ago, a 19-year-old Tom Houck stood in front of the Southern Christian Leadership Committee (SCLC) headquarters on Auburn Avenue and waited for a ride to the Freedom House where he was staying.

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