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University of Georgia

The University of Georgia is mourning the loss of four students killed in a vehicular accident.

"Heartbreaking and tragic."

Those are the words UGA President Jere Morehead used to describe Wednesday night's fatal crash near Watkinsville that killed four female UGA students.

Oconee County authorities say the accident happened when two vehicles collided on Georgia State Route 15.

The victims have been identified as: Kayla Canedo, 19, of Alpharetta; Brittany Feldman, 20, of Alpharetta; Christina Semeria, 19, of Milton; and Halle Scott, 19, of Dunwoody.

campus carry
Jaime Henry-White, File / Associated Press

With one week left for Gov. Nathan Deal to veto or sign a bill the “campus carry” bill, some faculty members have ramped up their efforts against the measure.

Ivan Ingermann, associate professor at the University of Georgia’s film and theater department, said he and many of his colleagues don’t want guns in their classrooms.

“We're saying it, we're just not being heard, and that's the frustrating part,” he said.

He said if the bill becomes law, he would seriously consider leaving the university if he gets another offer.

Courtesy of Bettina Love

When you think of a classroom, you might not envision graffiti adorning the walls, with a DJ spinning Public Enemy to accompany a break dancer.

With hip-hop education, though, classroom management takes its cues from students’ real life experiences.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Office of Public Service and Outreach

If you’re in the Atlanta area and want to eat oysters, one of the places to go is Kimball House in Decatur. On any given day, they might have oysters from Washington State, California, South Carolina, Maryland and Virginia. The menu changes daily.  

“A lot of my focus is on maintaining what we hope others will view as a really solid oyster menu,” said Bryan Rackley, one of the owners of the restaurant.

UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

As the sea level rises, roads, homes and hotels will all be affected. So will natural habitats, like the miles and miles of marshes on Georgia’s coast. A University of Georgia project aims to help the state adapt.

The sea level has gone up about a foot in the last century, and scientists project it could go up another three feet in the next century.

“Areas that are now dry land, will become intertidal in the future,” said Clark Alexander, a coastal geologist at UGA’s Skidaway Insititute of Oceanography. “And so these are areas where marshes will develop over time.”

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