Elly Yu | WABE 90.1 FM

Elly Yu

Reporter

Elly Yu is a reporter at WABE, where she first got her start in public radio as an graduate student intern in 2013. Since then, she’s reported for WNYC, NPR, and Marketplace among others.  In 2014, Elly was awarded with an immigration reporting fellowship from the Institute for Justice and Journalism.

Elly holds a bachelor’s in international relations from the University of Southern California, and a master’s in journalism from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, where she co-hosted a podcast. 

Elly Yu / WABE

A state lawmaker and advocates fighting the opioid addiction crisis in Georgia say they're hoping for more resources in the U.S. Senate's health plan to repeal and replace Obamacare.

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At a press conference Friday surrounded by loved ones of people who died of opioid overdoses in Georgia, state Sen. Renee Unterman, R-Buford, said the state is “in the throes” of an epidemic.

Elly Yu / WABE

As the U.S. Senate works on a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, voters in Georgia's 6th Congressional District are paying attention.

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The issue of health care has loomed over the race between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff, who face each other in a runoff on Tuesday. First, the reason there is a special election in the 6th District is because former Congressman Tom Price resigned to become the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services.

John Amis / Associated Press file

A federal judge in Atlanta ruled in favor of a Georgia immigrant Monday, ordering the federal government to reinstate her temporary protection from deportation.

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Last month, federal immigration officials stripped Jessica Colotl, 29, of her protection under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program for young people brought into the country illegally as children.

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Starting July 1, private universities in Georgia that adopt sanctuary policies to protect students without legal status would lose funding under a new state law.

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In response, a group of students has launched an emergency texting service meant to warn students without legal status of immigration enforcement on campuses in the metro Atlanta area.  

Scott Applewhite / AP

An estimated 720,000 Georgians could lose health insurance over the next 10 years under the revised Republican health care proposal that passed the U.S. House this month, according to an analysis of the Congressional Budget Office report.

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Bill Custer, a professor at Georgia State University, calculated the figures from the CBO report’s estimates. He said the CBO estimate is based on how states would react to the reduction in federal funding for Medicaid.

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