Selma Marchers Reflect On Civil Rights Movement 50 Years Later | WABE 90.1 FM

Selma Marchers Reflect On Civil Rights Movement 50 Years Later

Mar 2, 2015

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed honored civil rights leaders who marched from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in March 1965.
Credit Alison Guillory / WABE

“Bloody Sunday” in Selma, Alabama – where civil rights marchers were beaten by police on their way to Montgomery – marks its 50th anniversary this weekend. 

The city of Atlanta honored some of those who participated in the march at a ceremony Monday.

More than 100 people came to City Hall to share stories and sing songs of the civil rights movement.    

Juanita Jones Abernathy, the widow of Ralph D. Abernathy, was one of the organizers of the march from Selma to Montgomery. She speaks while Atlanta City Council members Mary Norwood (pictured left) and Keisha Lance Bottoms (right) look on.
Credit Alison Guillory / WABE

Juanita Jones Abernathy, the widow of Ralph David Abernathy, was one of the organizers of the march.

“We started off in Selma and we literally marched all the way with blistered feet ... because we had to have the right to vote,” Abernathy says. 

The march was sparked by the death of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson, who was shot by an Alabama State Trooper.

The events inspired President Lyndon B. Johnson to pass the Voting Rights Act later that year. 

A five-day commemorative march from Selma to Montgomery is planned for later this month.