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atlanta tornado

John Lorinc / WABE

Four tornadoes passed through Metro Atlanta on Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service in Peachtree City.

Two of the confirmed twisters touched down in Fulton County, another one was close to the Jackson/Banks County line.

The strongest of the four was in Cobb County.

>The EF-1 tornado landed on Delta Court, crossed Six Flags Parkway and onto Discovery Boulevard.  

It had winds of about 100 miles per hour.

"It does some damage to trees, buildings, even flipped over a tractor-trailer," said NWS meteorologist Kent McMullin.

The rain and heavy winds started Wednesday, Nov. 30 in the early afternoon, when a well-developed storm system with two specific waves of precipitation entered the area.
John Lorinc / WABE

Crews are combing over North Georgia, including metro Atlanta, to assess the damage done from Wednesday's storms.  

The rain and heavy winds started in the early afternoon, when a well-developed storm system with two specific waves of precipitation entered the area.

"And at that point the atmosphere was warm and moist, so a lot of the ingredients came together to produce storms and some of those storms were able to put down a lot of wind," said Brian Lynn, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

Severe storms hit parts of north Georgia on Wednesday, with at least one confirmed tornado.
John Haas / WABE

A radar-confirmed tornado was spotted about seven miles north of downtown Atlanta Wednesday afternoon.

It forced officials at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport to halt flights for about 15 minutes.

Authorities say there were some downed trees and power lines reported in the metro Atlanta area.

A tornado forms over a house near Pilger, Neb., Monday, June 16, 2014.
Mark 'Storm' Farnik / Associated Press

A decade ago, Hurricane Katrina struck nearly 500 miles from Atlanta. Even that far away, the storm still caused 18 tornadoes across the state.

Georgia Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Lisa Janak says tornados are only one danger a hurricane poses to the metro area. 

“It can bring high winds that can knock down trees and power lines. It can have a tropical storm that can hover over an area, drop a lot of rain [and] cause severe flooding,” she says. 

That's why Janak says even metro Atlanta residents should have a disaster readiness plan.