Refugees | WABE 90.1 FM

Refugees

Craig Ruttle / Associated Press

A federal judge issued an emergency order Saturday night temporarily barring the U.S. from deporting people from nations subject to President Donald Trump's travel ban, saying travelers who had been detained had a strong argument that their legal rights had been violated.

U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly in New York issued the emergency order after lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union filed a court petition on behalf of people from seven predominantly Muslim nations who were detained at airports across the country as the ban took effect.

Wilfredo Lee / Associated Press

At least four people were held at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport Saturday following President Donald Trump's executive actions restricting immigration, according to a local immigration attorney. 

Sarah Owings, who chairs the Georgia-Alabama chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said the original four people who were reported detained Saturday afternoon have since been released. She added that others were in custody, though it was unclear how many.

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

1. HILLARY CLINTON, DONALD TRUMP EMBOLDENED BY COMMANDING SUPER TUESDAY VICTORIES

Now the leading Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are setting their sights on the general election — and each other.

2. HOW THE ISLAMIC STATE GROUP IS TRYING TO WIDEN ITS FOOTPRINT IN PAKISTAN

StoryCorps Atlanta

Sarah McCormick and Safia Jama work together at a refugee resettlement and resource organization. Jama -- a Somalian refugee and mother of nine ─ is referred to by many of her colleagues as “Hoya,” the Somali word for “mother.”  

In the StoryCorps Atlanta booth, Sarah invites “Hoya” to share some of what she’s learned on her path from being a refugee to her work resettling others.   

This story was recorded in partnership with New American Pathways.

Stephannie Stokes / WABE

When Bill Mehlinger bought the Clarkston Thriftown in 1990, he would have described it as your typical American grocery store. The small, 10-aisle supermarket built in the 70s was well-stocked with things like Hamburger Helper, Jif Peanut Butter and Campbell’s soup.

Mehlinger had just come from a long career with the grocery chain Winn-Dixie. This was the kind of food he figured would sell.

But it didn’t.

“Sales started going down,” Mehlinger said, “and then they kept getting worse and worse.”

Within three years, the store’s sales had dropped by a third.

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